Upcoming Events

Tuesday, February 3, 2015 - 5:00pm to 6:30pm
Slow Teaching: An Introduction to Contemplative Pedagogical Practices

How can we apply the principles of mindfulness to teach our students more effectively? This workshop will introduce you to resources and practices in contemplative pedagogy. When incorporated into teaching, contemplative exercises can meaningfully enhance active learning, deepen student engagement, and stimulate inquiry and insight.
In this session, you will be guided through a few contemplative pedagogical exercises so as to experience them first-hand and come away with strategies and resources for you to try out with your students in the future. No prior knowledge of mindful teaching practices is required.
For more information, please contact Alexia Ferracuti, CTL Assistant Director.
Please register here.

Communicating Science to the Public

Sponsored by the Yale Center for Teaching and Learning and the Sackler Institute for Biological Physical and Engineering Sciences
Eligibility: Open to all graduate students and post-doctoral fellows in any science department
The goal is improve your ability to interact with community groups, charities, venture capitalists, and members of your family, the media and anyone who does not have your science background
The classes of about 20 each are informal and interactive
There are modules on public speaking, science writing, using acting techniques to improve your presentation skills, and dealing with the media
There is no credit, but after completing the course participants will receive a certificate that can be attached to transcripts and applications
Please register here. Anyone who does not get into the first session will automatically considered an applicant for the subsequent ones. We will notify those who are accepted and give you the room number as soon as possible
The faculty:
Robert Bazell, adjunct professor of MCDB and former chief science correspondent for NBC News
Gordon Edelstein, artistic director Long Wharf Theater
Karen Peart and Bill Hathaway from the Yale Office of Public Affairs
Carl Zimmer, science columnist for the New York Times and several other publications

Wednesday, February 4, 2015 - 9:00am to 10:15am
Quantitative Reasoning Workshop Series (Advanced Teaching Workshop)

Are you preparing to teach a section, lab, or lecture or to hold office hours where you will be presenting quantitative concepts? This three-workshop series will help you learn how to effectively present quantitative ideas to your students.
We will cover topics including:
the role of visualizations, demonstrations and examples
how to make abstract ideas seem more concrete
evaluating student learning and how you, as an instructor, are doing
active learning as strategy for conveying quantitative ideas
Please register here.
For additional information, please contact Adam Dynes or Susie Kimport.

Thursday, February 5, 2015 - 5:00pm to 6:30pm
Fundamentals of Teaching Science

Are you teaching a class, section, or lab in the sciences for the first time? Have you taught before but are looking for ways to become a more engaging and effective teacher? Then join us for this interactive three-week workshop in which we will discuss many of the nuts and bolts that will help you lead a successful (and enjoyable) class, section, or lab this year. Topics will include setting goals for your class, adapting to various learning styles and environments, engaging your class through active learning, soliciting feedback, and grading effectively. Light refreshments will be served.
For more information, please contact Elizabeth Boulton or Robert Wickham.
Please register here.

Friday, February 6, 2015 - 2:15pm to 3:45pm
Teaching as an International Student (Advanced Teaching Workshop)

Are you an international student in the sciences or humanities? Have you faced challenges while teaching in the U.S. classroom? This workshop aims to help you adapt to these challenges and provide you with the means to continue developing your teaching skills.
We will explore good teaching practices, brainstorm various problems, and provide information about the institutions already in place at Yale to offer you help as an international teacher. The workshop will also feature a panel of successful international graduate student teachers who have kindly agreed to share their stories with us and to answer any questions you might have. You don’t have to reinvent the wheel!
[This Advanced Teaching Workshop fulfills the diversity requirement for the Certificate in College Teaching Preparation (CCTP).]
Please register here.
For more information, email eleonora.buonocore@yale.edu or stuart.duncan@yale.edu

Monday, February 9, 2015 - 3:00pm to 4:30pm
Fundamentals of Teaching the Humanities

This three-part workshop will help new and returning teaching fellows build confidence in the classroom, gain and develop a wide range of concrete tools to lead effective discussions, and manage challenges specific to teaching the humanities. During the first session, we will address some of most essential information needed to become a Yale TF, including setting goals, communicating expectations, engaging students, and running fruitful class discussions. The second session will address writing, assessment techniques, and student feedback. The third will consist of a discussion of grading issues and a sampling of difficult situations.
Please register here.
For more information, contact Gerardo Con Diaz or Anne Schindel. 

Tuesday, February 10, 2015 - 2:00pm to 4:00pm
Teaching Ancient Languages (Advanced Teaching Workshop)

Are you a teacher of ancient languages looking to broaden your teaching strategies? Participants in this workshop will review backwards design and multimodal instruction before delving into the practical applications of these teaching skills. The majority of the workshop will then be devoted to developing a collection of ideas for engaging, active, and multimodal exercises to be used in the classroom.
Participants will develop viable lesson plans to bring to their classroom and workshop their ideas with their peers. Emphasis will be placed on alternatives to drills and more traditional grammar and translation methods of instructing ancient languages.
Please bring a copy of what you think could be a successful, engaging activity for teaching your language. 2 
Please register here.
For more information, email eleonora.buonocore@yale.edu and ian.althouse@yale.edu

Tuesday, February 10, 2015 - 5:45pm
OEI Grant Presentation: "Riemenschneider Revisited + Wölff App Sneak Peek"

History of Art graduate student Greg Bryda will share his dissertation research and also to offer tutorial to the Yale Community on the Wölff App, his winning proposal for a Center for Teaching and Learning “Online Education Innovation Grant.”  
Bryda’s application stated in part, “Wölff is a tablet- and web-based application that democratizes access to high-resolution images of the world’s history of art and beautifies the way we study and teach with them. It is named after the Swiss art historian Heinrich Wölfflin, who around the year 1900 revolutionized art history by introducing the state-of-the-art technology of slide projection to accompany his lectures with photographs that everyone could see.
“With Wölff, users will crowd-source the history of art on one singular cloud platform. Unlimited cloud space will permit students and scholars to contribute to the public catalog, which will centralize the numerous sources of digitized artworks for educational purposes.”

Thursday, February 12, 2015 - 11:30am to 1:00pm
Beyond Academics: The Role of a TF

As we enter the classroom as TFs our roles as educators are clear, but beyond academics, what other roles do we take on? In this workshop, participants will engage in a discussion to try and answer this question. We will look at the extra-curricular stresses that students may be grappling with and also evaluate our evolving roles as mentors. In the second half of this workshop, participants will hear from a panel of speakers from the Office of Disabilities, Mental Health and Counseling, a residential college dean, and an undergraduate advisor.
For more information, please email Stuart Duncan and Ian Althouse. Please register here.
 
 

Thursday, February 12, 2015 - 5:00pm to 6:30pm
Fundamentals of Teaching Science

Are you teaching a class, section, or lab in the sciences for the first time? Have you taught before but are looking for ways to become a more engaging and effective teacher? Then join us for this interactive three-week workshop in which we will discuss many of the nuts and bolts that will help you lead a successful (and enjoyable) class, section, or lab this year. Topics will include setting goals for your class, adapting to various learning styles and environments, engaging your class through active learning, soliciting feedback, and grading effectively. Light refreshments will be served.
For more information, please contact Elizabeth Boulton or Robert Wickham.
Please register here.

Friday, February 13, 2015 - 5:00pm
Associates in Teaching applications due

The competitive Associates in Teaching (AT) program, offered in collaboration between the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and the Center for Teaching and Learning, allows advanced Ph.D. students to expand their range of teaching experiences and responsibilities. 
Through this program, doctoral students work jointly with a cooperating faculty member to conceptualize or redesign, plan, and deliver an undergraduate course. 
Experience shows that this program, begun in 2009, provides a dynamic cooperative teaching experience for graduate students and faculty members both, with the faculty member offering direct feedback on curriculum, leading discussions, lecturing, demonstrating, or whatever teaching practices enlisted in that course.
 

Monday, February 16, 2015 - 3:00pm to 4:30pm
Fundamentals of Teaching the Humanities

This three-part workshop will help new and returning teaching fellows build confidence in the classroom, gain and develop a wide range of concrete tools to lead effective discussions, and manage challenges specific to teaching the humanities. During the first session, we will address some of most essential information needed to become a Yale TF, including setting goals, communicating expectations, engaging students, and running fruitful class discussions. The second session will address writing, assessment techniques, and student feedback. The third will consist of a discussion of grading issues and a sampling of difficult situations.
Please register here.
For more information, contact Gerardo Con Diaz or Anne Schindel. 

Tuesday, February 17, 2015 - 2:00pm to 4:00pm
Teaching Ancient Languages (Advanced Teaching Workshop)

Are you a teacher of ancient languages looking to broaden your teaching strategies? Participants in this workshop will review backwards design and multimodal instruction before delving into the practical applications of these teaching skills. The majority of the workshop will then be devoted to developing a collection of ideas for engaging, active, and multimodal exercises to be used in the classroom.
Participants will develop viable lesson plans to bring to their classroom and workshop their ideas with their peers. Emphasis will be placed on alternatives to drills and more traditional grammar and translation methods of instructing ancient languages.
Please bring a copy of what you think could be a successful, engaging activity for teaching your language. 2 
Please register here.
For more information, email eleonora.buonocore@yale.edu and ian.althouse@yale.edu

Monday, February 23, 2015 - 3:00pm to 4:30pm
Fundamentals of Teaching the Humanities

This three-part workshop will help new and returning teaching fellows build confidence in the classroom, gain and develop a wide range of concrete tools to lead effective discussions, and manage challenges specific to teaching the humanities. During the first session, we will address some of most essential information needed to become a Yale TF, including setting goals, communicating expectations, engaging students, and running fruitful class discussions. The second session will address writing, assessment techniques, and student feedback. The third will consist of a discussion of grading issues and a sampling of difficult situations.
Please register here.
For more information, contact Gerardo Con Diaz or Anne Schindel.